Great exercises to learn to draw in perspective

Great exercises to learn to draw in perspective. Let’s do some easy hands-on exercises to develop our design and painting crafts and acquire some attitude! I created them with beginners in mind, so don’t worry if the air is a bit of an intimidating topic. We’ve all been through that. Before you jump into these activities, be sure to look at my article Viewpoint from a Mark: How it goes and how to practice it for your design. He will talk to you about how the perspective came about and what it is and learn some important terms and principles.

Erratic boulders

Let’s get started super easy and draw some rocks on a piece of paper. Only the outline will do. No gradient or texture is needed. It is vital to indicate that you bring them to various areas and places on the film. You will mark that there is a limited view, and it is hard to tell which of the stones is far from the observer or even at what extent. The reason is simple. Objects that are further apart from us look more petite. Our brain knows this and uses it to determine the distance to objects. But the boulders are of different sizes, and we do not see the boulders that we draw to each other.

For example, one of the small rocks in your lotus flower drawing could be very far away, so it would be much more extensive and tower over all the others if they were next to each other. So how are we working to identify which of these boulders are at what distance? We’ll use some fun perspective tricks. First, erase some of the rocks and redraw them, overlaying some of the others. It is the simplest way to make it clear that one object is closer to us than another. Of course, we also don’t want the rocks to appear flying through the air, so why not add the boundary line towards the rock’s back higher on the page? Do you see how this already pushes some back and others towards the viewer?

Flying cubes

learn to draw

This one-point view exercise is specially created to help trainees practice the idea. Remember to read some basic principles first in my related article. Draw a horizon line on a blank sheet of paper, tall or short as you like. Then choose a vanishing point (VP) on that line. Remember, one point perspective means a vice president. Then use a ruler or other straight object to draw many lines of convergence from the sides of the document to the going time. Keep the paths clear but visible enough for you to perform this exercise. The lines don’t want to be an equal distance from each other, so don’t worry. Draw several, but not so many that you can no longer keep them separate.

Now start drawing some perspective cubes at one point in the scene. It means drawing them as if you were looking at one of the (almost) completely straight flat surfaces rather than one of the corners. Anything above the horizon line will show part of the bottom of the object because eye level is below, so you are looking at it. Anything below the horizon will show a portion of the top because it is looking down. As you go, think about what these cubes and cuboids might look like in real life, instead of just lightboxes, and turn them into other objects. It could be a tissue box, a dice, an old TV, an aquarium, a book, what do you have?

With a trace

Here’s another tremendous one-point perspective exercise for you. You will need a relatively thin sheet of paper, such as parchment paper, and an image with a one-point perspective. You can explore the internet for something like “interior design” or “street,” which often show pictures in a single point perspective. You can use an image from a book or take your photograph. You will now trace the example on your thin sheet of paper, so we recommend you write it out or force it on your iPad or your computer screen to place the form on top. The most crucial point is to track only some parts and leave others out. You could draw the main lines of the wall but not the carpet or the dresser, or the street and the ropes, but not the shutters and gates.

I also suggest seeing and drawing the fading point (follow the convergence lines) and the horizon at this point, as you will need it for the next step. Flip the original image so you can’t see it and add the things you left in your drawing using the perspective rulers. Anything that is in view and has a nearly simple pattern works well. At this point, don’t worry about small details, shading, or texture.

With a trace

Here’s another tremendous one-point perspective exercise for you. You will need a relatively thin sheet of paper, such as parchment paper, and an image with a one-point perspective. You can explore the internet for something like “interior design” or “street,” which often show pictures in a single point perspective. You can use an image from a ledger or take your photograph. You will now trace the example on your thin sheet of paper, so we recommend you write it out or crack it on your iPad or your computer screen to place the form on top.

The most crucial point is to track only some parts and leave others out. You could draw the main lines of the wall but not the carpet or the dresser, or the street and the homes, but not the shutters and gates. I also suggest getting and drawing the going point (follow the convergence lines) and the range, as you will need it for the next level. Flip the original image so you can’t see it and add the things you left in your drawing using the perspective rulers. Anything that is in view and has a nearly simple shape works well. At this point, don’t worry about small details, shading, or texture.

Two points? Check

Remember the one-point perspective grid we created in the second exercise? Now we will raise the bar slightly and create one for the two-point perspective. Draw your horizon somewhat higher than the center of the paper, so there is more space below than above. So because this is a two-point viewpoint, combine two vanishing points, one on the right and one on the left. Add your meeting lines in the course of these two PVs. When you’re done, your layout should look a bit like a checkerboard (its okay if some of the “squares” are rectangular).

Now you can start adding some grid boxes below the horizon line as if looking down at them. Use fine lines, as the containers are only an aid to perspective. Draw relatively high, a bit like milk cartons, but try to keep your surface square. If they don’t precisely fit the grid, draw more convergence lines as needed.

It’s not rubbish at all.

This little exercise takes some preparation but is inexpensive, easy to do, and very helpful in helping you understand various types of perspectives. Take an empty milk carton, tissue box, or any other cuboid-shaped object. You will also require a leader and a dark marker (or paint and brush). In my example, I also used advanced wall paint to give the cardboard a quick coat, but it is not required. Imagine that your object is a tower and draw arches on the sides. The most exact arch shape consists of a circle inserted halfway into a square (see image above). They should all be brutally the same size, so help create a quick pattern on paper and cut it out for tracing if you have time. When you’re finished, set your tower on the counter in front of you and effortlessly draw from various aspects.

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